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#41 Calamity_Jones

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 02:45 PM

The thing with us brits is there's so many different accents, it's not a big country, but hell.. there's scouse, brummy, recieved pronounciation (queens english), cockney, tyke (even within yorkshire where tyke is the accent there's variations like the scum from barnsleh)... And all of that is just England, then there's the Scottish, Welsh and Irish too! We do have a very high population density I guess, and we have been invaded by everyone and invaded everyone ourselves so makes sense I suppose...

Many of these accents can sound drastically different, which I imagine would cause a great deal of confusion to forgeiners. Even in different parts of the UK people think I'm called Matt instead of Mark due to my accent (though I never really understood how Mark can sound like Matt...)

Accents to me in America sound rather simmilar, there's some variations, like the dreadful southern drawl... *shudders*. There's accents specific to New York and what-not, but they still sound simmilar. I imagine a forgeing person might find a brummy hard to understand, I certainly do... bloody southerners! :p

http://www.clean-fun.../html/f1753.htm

Nuff said :D


I remember reading that ages ago, well funny :D

After that i told him to get out until he speaks normal English :). It seems that in very early after American Independence the dictionary author is a person who learned English for 3 months :p.


Jolly good show! :p

edit: holy fuck, too many tounge smilies...

Edited by Calamity_Jones, 10 January 2007 - 02:49 PM.

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#42 duke_Qa

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 03:10 PM

tongue smilies and smilies generally is an interesting twist in language these days :p.

come to think of it, internet-english might have smilies of different sorts as empathic letters/symbols. so what we are doing on the forums and msn's can be considered a new step in linguistic evolution :D

Edited by duke_Qa, 10 January 2007 - 03:10 PM.

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#43 Ash

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 03:13 PM

Us Tykes have an odd way of pronouncing the mid-long 'a' in words like 'Mark'. Sounds like 'Mahk'. Or so people tell me.

Same as the word 'fuck'.


Oh, and don't get me started on the word 'scone'. DEFINITELY long O, as in 'cone', not short O as in 'gone'.

EDIT: Duke, I actually wrote an article on Internet English for a project. If you search the forum you should find it...I attached it to a post as pdf. I asked a lot of Revorians for help with it :p

Edited by Paradox, 10 January 2007 - 03:15 PM.


#44 Calamity_Jones

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 03:24 PM

One thing's for sure, we can't say the "h" at the beggining of any word that starts with it :p

Hull is of course... 'ull for example :D
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#45 Ash

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 04:00 PM

Actually, Hull is one of the few I do pronounce the H. House is usually a good one to pronounce correctly...

For clarification, Yorkshire people tend to pronounce the 'ow' sound as 'ah'. So, 'roundabout' becomes 'rarndabart'. You see now why one must be wary whenever we come to 'house', especially given our tendency to drop the 'h'. Even in dialects, there are exceptions to the rule.


Oh, and before you start complaining we never say 'the', TAKE THE TIME TO NOTICE THE GLOTTAL STOPS. We do say it, we just don't waste the time to say it. Anyone south of Lincoln doesn't seem to understand a glottal stop.

Edited by Paradox, 10 January 2007 - 04:02 PM.


#46 chemical ali

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 06:55 PM

Bloody commoners and their local dialects, pronounce your letters properly you prole.
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#47 Ash

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Posted 10 January 2007 - 07:06 PM

I will, the day you learn to spell. Although I'll grant you, that last post was spelled correctly.

Edited by Paradox, 10 January 2007 - 07:06 PM.


#48 Copaman

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 12:39 AM

Us Tykes have an odd way of pronouncing the mid-long 'a' in words like 'Mark'. Sounds like 'Mahk'. Or so people tell me.

Oh, and don't get me started on the word 'scone'. DEFINITELY long O, as in 'cone', not short O as in 'gone'.


Yes to the Scone remark. You're absolutely 100% correctly correct. And assuming that you meant U.S. tykes, only some of them do that. Others will pronounce it somewhere along the lines of Maak and leave out the R completely. It's totally dpendant on how the child learns - my sister had a 'Firsty' problem as a little'un. We'd tease her cause she'd want something to drink and she'd say "I'm Firsty" and the we'd say "Does that make us second-y, third-y and fourth-y?" LOL childhoods...

But why bash only the Americans-- why not the French, Spanish, etc. on their pronunciation as well? Sometimes I swear the Frech either A) Add a 'W' to the start of most words or B) have some Peanut Butter stuck in their mouth and they can't quite get to it... I have come to beat joo, Wicky Booby

Edited by Copaman, 12 January 2007 - 12:42 AM.

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#49 Comrade Kal

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 12:41 AM

Scone as in gone.


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#50 DemonWolf

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 12:42 AM

You're all OFFICIALLY idiots for thinking this matters in the slightest. You get varitions on everything, everywhere. You don't like it, deal. The world's not gonna change because some kid wants it spelled 'colour' not 'color'.
(Besides, we didn't ask the chinese to use our variations, they just did.)
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#51 Calamity_Jones

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 10:00 AM

Getting irate is not going to make this discussion any more interesting. Now bugger off...

Incidentally Copaman... By tyke, we were referring to an accent :p

I pronounce Scone with the long "o". Like Paradox said... like "cone" incidentally... it's just like the argument... is it "boyses" or "boy-es" ... it's not like any-fucker ever shops there anyways so who cares :)

Anyways, you're right in saying you get variations. I'm not surprised spelling has changed over there. Languages do evolve, I just don't like the direction they take sometimes... As I said earlier, it just seems lazy and looks wrong. More than anything, the over use of "z" just distracts me...
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#52 CodeCat

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 02:06 PM

Bloody commoners and their local dialects, pronounce your letters properly you prole.

Indeed, speak proper Indo-European ffs, not that stupid Anglo-saxon dialect!
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#53 OmegaBolt

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 03:49 PM

For clarification, Yorkshire people tend to pronounce the 'ow' sound as 'ah'. So, 'roundabout' becomes 'rarndabart'. You see now why one must be wary whenever we come to 'house', especially given our tendency to drop the 'h'. Even in dialects, there are exceptions to the rule.


I dont say rarndabart, its not Yorkshire people who say that (nor do we say 'ouse), thats more like people off Eastenders, which, I might add, is the worst soap ever made. Emmerdale and Coronation Street FTW! :p

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#54 Calamity_Jones

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 07:05 PM

yech.... soaps...

All that happens in them things is characters get introduced and then killed off in subsequent episodes by tragic means :p (I should prolly watch more soaps, there's a higher kill-toll than in disaster movies)
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#55 Ash

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 07:26 PM

You've never heard it said 'rarndabart'? You've OBVIOUSLY never been to Barnsley :p

#56 chemical ali

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 07:54 PM

Bloody commoners and their local dialects, pronounce your letters properly you prole.

Indeed, speak proper Indo-European ffs, not that stupid Anglo-saxon dialect!


So Europe has now a dialect of its own or is that your little socialist-Europhile dream?
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#57 Calamity_Jones

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 10:34 PM

You've never heard it said 'rarndabart'? You've OBVIOUSLY never been to Barnsley :p


bin' t' footin' t' barnsleh t' don' yeh mean :p
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#58 CodeCat

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 01:03 PM

So Europe has now a dialect of its own or is that your little socialist-Europhile dream?

Oh STFU. Indo-European is the ancient ancestor of almost all European languages, of which Germanic, Italic (latin), Celtic, Slavic (i.e. Russian), Indian/Iranian, Greek etc. were all dialects. Later, these dialects evolved further, splitting up into more languages (Germanic split into North Germanic, East Germanic and West Germanic), and then West Germanic split up into (Anglo)-Saxon, Frankish, High German etc. The Anglo-Saxon dialect then finally evolved naturally into what we now call English.

So, if you're telling people to stop speaking dialects, think about which petty little dialect of Indo-European you are speaking. ^_^
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#59 Cheshire Fox

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:02 AM

Terribly sorry, I haven't had time to read all this thread but I'd like to point out that there was no official spelling of ANY word until the I think mid to late 1800's, and before that people spelled words however the hell they wanted and it didn't matter at all. So neither British nor American spellings are really "correct." Your spellings did not come before ours, they were probably created around the same time.
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#60 CodeCat

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:13 PM

But writers did often tend to agree a lot about how they spelled things. There just wasn't an official language body, spelling was more of a consensus among writers. Just compare a bunch of early modern English texts. While there are some differences, they still generally have the same spellings for the same sounds (as they were pronounced at that time).
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