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#21 Mathijs

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Posted 20 November 2007 - 07:36 PM

Expand your mind a little.

I recommend books like...

The Catcher in the Rye - J.D Salinger
Heart of Darkness - J. Conrad
On the Road - J. Kerouac
The Great Gatsby - F.S Fitzgerald
Norwegian Wood - H. Murakami

I could name plenty more, but those books there really touched me.

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#22 morgoth946

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 11:56 PM

I'm tired of reading bad books. I have book exams practically every two weeks. I'm lucky that i'm doing a post-obligatory school and now books are classics and better.

When I was doing obligatory school, they really made me loose all the interest I could have. My mum is teacher and she told me that it was impossible to motivate kids to read making them to read books that were made only to be sold in schools, basically because they're made only to get money, so they suck.
And that's how they want to motivate kids? Making them reading the worst books in the world and making them to hurry? I think it's not the best way, really.

I like reading, but i only like fantasy like lotr and such. The problem is that from september untill june, i have to read the books of the school, so I can't read what I like. Last summer I read the silmarillion, LOTR and another book that I forgot its name, but it was fantasy :rolleyes:

EDIT: I think that reading books is like everything, you can't like it or not. Anyway, first you have to try it and see if you like it or not. If you try with books or books that you don't like you will say that reading sucks. That's what is happening in the schools of my country.
Anyway, if you can read the books you want and they encourage you, you'll know if you like it or not. It's like doing sport, you can like it or not. Anyway if you don't like it you'll pay the consequences, maybe you'll be fat, or maybe not. Maybe you'll be stupid, or not.

Edited by morgoth946, 09 December 2007 - 12:05 AM.

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#23 Bart

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 12:15 AM

Reading is great. If you're reading a good book it can be like having a second life for a few weeks (or months, depends on the size and how much you read, of course). That's the main difference between books and films, which only last a few hours.
TV series, on the other hand, bring back the "second life" element.
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#24 morgoth946

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 12:49 AM

I remember when I read a book called "El misterio de la Isla de Tolkland" (it would be the Mystery of Tolkland Island in english). It was the most amazing book I ever read. That second life was only of 4 o 5 days, but I read it again and again!
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#25 Grizzlez

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 12:58 AM

I personally dont read much, but i used to read nearly 2 hours or so everyday. I think its because for a while life got busy and i didnt have time to read a book and then i got into a state where i perhaps lost interest but i didnt really bother reading much.
However, recently i have started to get more into reading and have a bigger urge to read more-even if its just like a book on psychology (maybe because im studying it now at school). But i have to say i think reading can show serious signs of maturity, when i used to read at a young age i did really well in school and was a good boy. At about the time i started getting into trouble and dossing about a lot i stopped reading. So for me its a good thing the reading urge is creeping back :rolleyes: .
But even for someone who doesnt read hardly anything any more-maybe 1-2 books a year depending on what comes out-reading can be one of the most enjoyable things you can do for a few hours a day because it gives you a chance to get away from real life and imagine a different scenario.

Also-can someone post all of the middle earth series and the order i should read them all-i plan to buy them all and read through everyone including re-reading lotr :p
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#26 Elvenlord

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 01:43 AM

I read pretty much constiently. I've read lotr 8-10 times, The Hobbit 4-5, and the Silmarillion 3-4.
I also highly recommend any books by David Eddings. He is truely an excellent author. He combines the epicness of lotr with an modern additude in the characters. The result is an Epic Fantasy, with plenty of comic relief between the characters.
I've read his The Belgariad series 7-8 times, along with The Mallorean 6-7, The Elenium and The Tamuli 3-4 times each.


@Grizzlez
Sorry, I can't think of the order off the top of my head, but I know it's the Silmarillion, The Hobbit, then lotr, but as for the rest.........

Edited by Elvenlord, 09 December 2007 - 01:48 AM.

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#27 Dain Ironfoot

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 02:55 PM

Tolkien is the only "cliche" fantasy (as in has your sterotypical dwarves, elves and other Tolkien imitations pinched by D&D and such) I've ever read. Everything else is fairly awfully written and always comes in trilogies or series which I won't touch with a bargepole.

Edited by Dain Ironfoot, 09 December 2007 - 02:57 PM.

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#28 Mathijs

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 03:10 PM

Agreed...

By the way, to add to my list of favourites:

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas - Hunter S. Thompson. (It's pretty much an autobiography of how he abuses a massive amount of dangerous drugs for a week or so, really amazing to read...)
Journey to the end of the Night - Joseph Ferdinand Céline.

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#29 Bebbe

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 03:16 PM

I recently read Papillon , and it was really good. Just started to read the sequel.

#30 Solinx

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 03:35 PM

Interesting, I didn't know there was a sequel. :unsure:

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#31 Devon

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 03:46 PM

for anyone starting to read, i would recommend the bartimaeus trilogy. hilarious books, good for about any age :unsure: breaks off from your typical fantasy stuff too.

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#32 Dain Ironfoot

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 04:11 PM

Ha! Yes! My little brother has the trilogy.. I read the first one a few years ago (The amulet of.... whatchamacallit) . Damn good fun, well written and well imagined. While on the subject of good teen literature (Which seems to include some good fantasy) I can remember the Abhorsen trilogy being bloody good and I remember the first few Artemis Fowl books being good (though I haven't read any of the new ones.. my brother has them, but I haven't had the urge to pinch them... but fairies with guns was fun :unsure: But I suppose I've grown out of that now)

If you're moving into more adult territories of fantasy and want to avoid the typical (i.e baddly written geeky) stuff I can reccomend

The book of lost things - Yay for dark gothic fairytailesque stuff
The Temeraire series - good fun(The first and 2nd one are great, the third is kinda bad) and PJ has bought the film rights for these as well.. so yay :p Napoleonic wars with dragons! While I realise Dragon riding has become part of cliche fantasy, I personally have never read any of that stuff, and I believe the way it's done here is somewhat original (And realistic) But it reads like Patrick O Brian with dragons :p
Mr Norrel and Jonathan Strange - One of my personaly favorites.. may be a bit heavy for some though. Magicians in the 18th century
Most stuff by Neil Gaiman. I just finished Neverwhere, and it's brilliant. Stardust is really good too (Don't expect anything as light hearted as the film)

Edited by Dain Ironfoot, 09 December 2007 - 11:25 PM.

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#33 Grizzlez

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 11:23 PM

well if anyone knows the best order to read all the middle earth books id appreciate it :unsure:
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#34 Dain Ironfoot

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 11:27 PM

Erm... Hobbit (When you're a kid), LOTR (when you're a bit older) Silmarillion and then all the unfinished stuff if you manage all those.

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#35 Beleg

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Posted 09 December 2007 - 11:50 PM

Well, I used to read a lot of stuff that I chose when I was 7-10. I read everything from fictional stuff like lotr (including The Hobbit and the Silmarillion) to biographies about George Washington. However, my school system has taken that completely away, now I read two books a month that I don't choose. I just finished reading The Odyssey and I am now working on Madea. :unsure:
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#36 Nertea

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 12:57 AM

I would recommend A Song of Ice And Fire by George Martin. It has amazingly bloody and realistic medieval themed war with all its politics and alliances, as well as a touch of fantasy. Not for the faint of heart or the little kiddies though.

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#37 The Best Guest

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:00 AM

A couple of good books would be Hatchet or The lord of the flies Both good for teens
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#38 Devon

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:22 AM

back to artemis fowl dain, the last one was pretty good (the 5th i think? it was called lost colony or something like that) and it had expanded from a little more than just a little kids book. also, root dies ;)

anyone here read enders game? good times, good times.

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#39 halbarad

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 10:32 AM

ah, theres nothing quite like settling down with a good book, im re-reading the his dark materials trilogy atm after watching the 1st film, and yes, i am still a kid, lol

the cliche'd fantasy books arent just unoriginal and boring, theyre seriously badly written as well, stay clear! i dont think lotr really come into the same category as it pretty much invented the genre.

wen im looking for a book i basically walk into a book store and start reading random books till i find one that catches me, best way to do it. tho it does mean i havent read too many classics...


and if we're listing books, the curious incident of the dog in the night-time is a brilliant book that everyone MUST read, right now!

Edited by halbarad, 11 December 2007 - 10:34 AM.

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#40 Solinx

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 12:12 PM

I would recommend A Song of Ice And Fire by George Martin. It has amazingly bloody and realistic medieval themed war with all its politics and alliances, as well as a touch of fantasy. Not for the faint of heart or the little kiddies though.

Seconded. I'm frequently looking at George Martin's page for updates on the next book. :thumbsupsmiley:

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