Jump to content


Photo

Schoolgirl's rickets blamed on sunscreen


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Caspa

Caspa

    title available

  • Members
  • 938 posts
  • Location:Sunderland
  •  Shine On, Lurk Moar

Posted 27 January 2011 - 05:46 PM

Posted Image

Tyler Attrill developed severe leg pains and was found to lack vitamin D, the deficiency which leads to the Victorian slum disease. Despite living in one of the sunniest places in the country, she had too little direct exposure to sunlight, doctors said. Hers is one of a growing number of cases of a disease thought to have been eliminated more than 80 years ago, but now occurring in children of all backgrounds.
Full-blown rickets causes deformities including bowed legs and curvature of the spine, and was associated with children growing up in dark 19th century tenements. It is caused by a deficiency of vitamin D, manufactured when the skin is exposed to sunlight.

Tyler's mother Lisa, a 36-year-old nurse from Sandown, Isle of Wight, said her daughter and son Ben, aged 10, enjoyed playing outside with friends but had always worn sun cream in hot weather. The Isle of Wight frequently records more hours of sunshine in a year than anywhere else in Britain. "We live right by the beach so Tyler was outside with her friends every day last summer," Mrs Attrill said. "I've always been very careful with her and her brother, and nagged them to wear hats and sun cream when it's hot. "I used to put factor 50 cream on to protect her skin. I thought I was doing the right thing."

She and husband Kevin, 49, first noticed a problem three years ago after Tyler had two operations to correct displaced leg bones unconnected with her condition. Their daughter failed to recover properly from the surgery, suffering severe pain a lot of the time. "Sometimes it would happen if she did too much exercise, but sometimes it would be out of the blue," said Mrs Attrill. At times, Tyler could not play with her friends and she had to give up her Irish dancing classes. The family took her to several doctors in a number of hospitals without result.
It was only in November, when they went to Southampton General, that doctors there, who had started to see similar cases, tested for vitamin deficiency. Describing the pain, Tyler said: "It would make my legs really heavy so I couldn't move them, and if I did they would click, and then that would really hurt. I couldn't move and I was crying at some points because it was so bad. It made my whole body feel really ill." Tyler was prescribed multivitamin tablets and her vitamin D levels are now far better. Her family want to publicise the dangers.

There are no national figures for cases of rickets which largely disappeared once the link to vitamin D was discovered in the 1920s. But doctors at Southampton General have seen more than 40 children from all backgrounds suffering with the condition in the last 12 months. Doctors in Newcastle upon Tyne were seeing 20 cases a year, they reported in the British Medical Journal last year, partly blaming the amount of time children spent indoors playing computer games. Prof Nicholas Clarke, consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Southampton General, said: "What has developed in Southampton is quite astonishing. "We are seeing cases across the board, from areas of deprivation to the middle classes. "Many of the children we've seen have low vitamin D and require treatment. "This is almost certainly a combination of the modern lifestyle, which involves a lack of exposure to sunlight and covering up in sunshine."
Hostile is a cunt.

Thought I'd have that here to save time.

#2 duke_Qa

duke_Qa

    I've had this avatar since... 2003?

  • Network Staff
  • 3,837 posts
  • Location:Norway
  • Division:Revora
  • Job:Artist

Posted 27 January 2011 - 07:33 PM

Never really use sunblock the few hours I'm out in the sun. Besides, I live in north-moria(/møre, modern and boring name) and we got very little sun to begin with because of the high mountains all over. Never broken a bone that I know of, have hit joints so i've been aching for a month or two sure, but never had any problems.

Food sources such as fatty fish, mushrooms, eggs, and meat are rich in vitamin D


Ah yes, Eggs and meat. Fish too i guess, mushrooms wasn't very popular in childhood but eh.

"I give you private information on corporations for free and I'm a villain. Mark Zuckerberg gives your private information to corporations for money and he's 'Man of the Year.'" - Assange


#3 Námo

Námo

    ***

  • Project Team
  • 1,291 posts
  • Projects:Middle-earth Lore, Cartography & Linguistics
  •  ...

Posted 27 January 2011 - 09:26 PM

//off-topic:

... I live in north-moria ...

That name just puzzled me, studying Tolkien linguistics ... Moria is a renowned place in Middle-earth, and the name Moria means "black chasm" or "black pit" in Sindarin (Grey-Elven language).

I tried to find it on the two Norwegian Wikipedia (both bokmål and nynorsk), but they only show Møre ... so is the form Moria a very old form, or just the name in your local dialect?
... elen síla lúmenn´ ómentielvo ...
... a star shines on the hour of our meeting ...
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#4 duke_Qa

duke_Qa

    I've had this avatar since... 2003?

  • Network Staff
  • 3,837 posts
  • Location:Norway
  • Division:Revora
  • Job:Artist

Posted 28 January 2011 - 07:39 AM

Very very old, was some viking-styled map with tons of disproportionate geometry. Might even be a fake, but it seemed very logical. Also, who is to say that JRR didn't copy the words he liked from old stuff like that?
Anyway, Møre/moria sounds pretty damn close in Norwegian, møre being a sleeker bastardized version. Møre/moria is probably the only way to get english-speaking people to pronounce that R properly ;). Møre comes from Mare(sea), which comes because of the dangerous part of the sea called Hustadvika between Sunnmøre and Nordmøre. It is still today acknowledged as the most dangerous part of our coast. The vikings went into a neighbouring fjord south of us, pulled their boat onto land, dragged it 5-6 kilometers and 100-250meters above the sea(They dug a ditch and made a road next to it to let them use bulls to help drag these big ships). Just to avoid that part of the sea.
It wouldn't surprise me if JRR saw pictures of this place and reinterpreted the word as black chasm, we got pretty big mountains that keeps us out of the sun for 3-4 months.



But I digress. What is it with the English that cause them to be so scared of sun that they put sunblock on their kids 24/7? The only ones in europe that should take pride in corpse-like pallor should be us up here, but even we get more than the british.

Edited by duke_Qa, 28 January 2011 - 07:43 AM.

"I give you private information on corporations for free and I'm a villain. Mark Zuckerberg gives your private information to corporations for money and he's 'Man of the Year.'" - Assange


#5 ambershee

ambershee

    Nimbusfish Rawks

  • Hosted
  • 3,114 posts
  • Location:Derby, UK
  • Projects:Mutator Week & Unreal 3 Projects
  •  Mad Mod Boffin

Posted 28 January 2011 - 09:59 AM

Who uses sunblock in the UK? And factor 50? Seriously, this isn't the Valley of the Kings.

The only time I've regretted not using sunblock here are the couple of times I've spent trekking mountains - because you get exposed to the sun quite a lot then.

#6 Námo

Námo

    ***

  • Project Team
  • 1,291 posts
  • Projects:Middle-earth Lore, Cartography & Linguistics
  •  ...

Posted 28 January 2011 - 10:40 AM

Thanks for the info, very interesting ... and yes, Tolkien took a lot of inspiration from Old Norse language, reading Völuspá and other works in the original language, and using some of this in his own writings.

Sun or no sun, your country has a beautiful and fascinating landscape (I've been there on a few occasions), perfect for living a simple life: building your house from natural materials, chopping wood for the fireplace, growing some healthy food in the garden, and maybe supply the diet with a little fishing or hunting.

I believe, that the problem raised in this topic is just a tiny part of a bigger pattern. Modern life gets more and more complicated, and also more artificial; the abundance of too many artificial industrial products make people confused, and then they tend to blame anybody else than themselves, instead of making some healthy choices for their own life.

I live in the countryside, about the same latitude as England. There's both a big lake and plenty of forest just outside our doorstep, and my children have always played a lot out-door, and always without any use of sun-blockers. Well, they've got a lot of scratches and wounds, and a few small scars from falling down from trees, but they are healthy and happy, natural children ... and most important: their life have been of their own choice, I've never really been forcing them (well, I try to advise them, but they don't always agree on what I say)
... elen síla lúmenn´ ómentielvo ...
... a star shines on the hour of our meeting ...
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#7 duke_Qa

duke_Qa

    I've had this avatar since... 2003?

  • Network Staff
  • 3,837 posts
  • Location:Norway
  • Division:Revora
  • Job:Artist

Posted 28 January 2011 - 12:07 PM

It's easier to build your own house out here than around the cities for sure, but as a farmboy myself I find the simple life a pretty national-romantic and naive idea these days.
Spoiler


Sunfactor is for those special occations like staying up in the mountains(the sun is a lot stronger up there, less atmosphere above you to block out UV-rays), dedicated sunbathing and vacations in tropical areas. Anything else is just good for you.

English parents/mothers seems to be more incompetent than scandinavian. There was a report on the news where the Norwegian prime minister visited Cameron last week, and one of the topics was the topic of women and public support to them. Norwegian women have more children AND have more work than british women. and they probably get more in government support than British ones on top of that. Is this sunblock-thing just another example of the generic low competence, apathy and lazyness of British women?

Edited by duke_Qa, 28 January 2011 - 12:08 PM.

"I give you private information on corporations for free and I'm a villain. Mark Zuckerberg gives your private information to corporations for money and he's 'Man of the Year.'" - Assange


#8 Pasidon

Pasidon

    Splitting Hares

  • Network Admins
  • 8,880 posts
  • Location:Da Moon
  • Projects:YouTube
  •  Actual Celebrity
  • Division:Community
  • Job:Community Admin

Posted 28 January 2011 - 10:44 PM

A connection between sunblock and lazy woman? Well, I'll be. But this whole thing is a scam. Because... the sun is the only factor is Vitamin D loss. Not that she's chubby and probably drinking Dr. Pepper more than lemon juice. She probably has Scurvy anyway... sounds more like it. But let's put the blame on something. Liars, cheats and other proud Europeans.

YT_Sig.jpgoutput_Fkd6it.gifFB_Sig.jpg


#9 Caspa

Caspa

    title available

  • Members
  • 938 posts
  • Location:Sunderland
  •  Shine On, Lurk Moar

Posted 02 February 2011 - 01:28 PM

You're saying that kid is chubby? She's fucking TWELVE YEARS OLD. Between your conspiracy theories bullshit and your failure to realize that children tend to have a little bit of meat on then, you're making yourself look like a complete moron. Or are you completely convinced that although the girl been diagnosed with an illness, had the source of the illness credibly verified and is receiving a treatment that is working, based on the diagnosis, that there's a cover-up? Take your Dr. Pepper, that only you yanks drink, and go drown your nonsensical bullshit post in it.
Hostile is a cunt.

Thought I'd have that here to save time.

#10 Hostile

Hostile

    Benefitting Humanity Simply by Showing Up!

  • Veterans
  • 9,551 posts
  • Location:Washington DC
  •  T3A Founder
  • Division:Revora
  • Job:Global Administrator
  • Donated
  • Association

Posted 02 February 2011 - 02:26 PM

Maybe parents should give their kids vitamins. I take one a day with 100% of most vitamins included.

#11 Caspa

Caspa

    title available

  • Members
  • 938 posts
  • Location:Sunderland
  •  Shine On, Lurk Moar

Posted 02 February 2011 - 04:27 PM

If you eat properly, are fairly active and don't wear factor 50 sunscreen every day, there's usually no need for vitamin tablets and all that horsecrap.
Hostile is a cunt.

Thought I'd have that here to save time.

#12 Guest_lma105_*

Guest_lma105_*
  • Guests

Posted 28 April 2011 - 09:06 AM

"scurvy" (how dare you)"lazy british women" (is this racist) "chubby" (slanderous??)OMG.... have you heard yourselves!!!! You must all be so proud of yourselves to criticise people you don't know, especially when one of them is a 12 year old child who probably has self-image issues like the majority of teenage girls.... maybe its views like your's and the endless media reporting on the perfect"size" that can lead to our youngsters developing eating disorders.
Caspa I love your blog I'm sure the family involved would be very happy with your support.... and I couldn't agree more.
Finally lets looks at the main points of this story.... it was published to raise awareness, which it has achieved as the CMO of England has produced new guidelines on vit d for all ages!!!! And also the child is now PAIN FREE....

#13 Radspakr Wolfbane

Radspakr Wolfbane

    The John Farnham of modding

  • Members
  • 7,722 posts
  • Location:less than 5 meters from my bed
  • Projects:Comeback tour
  •  The Retired Beard

Posted 28 April 2011 - 12:44 PM

I read the first post and thought "How very british".

They see a little bit of sun and run from it :p
Somehow I don't see that disease happening here in the land of Melanoma.
Something odd though is few Australians wear sunscreen except when Hiking or playing sports.
I haven't worn sunscreen since High School.

Oh and Ima06 you are on the Internet of course people are going to criticize people we don't know.
I've never bought the self image crap it's excuse making by weak people.
Somehow I doubt she's going to read this and if she does big deal.
The Mother is an idiot,she lives in a country with so little sunshine and she'd try to block it.
As a Nurse she'd have to know about Vitamin D and the body's need for it.

40 known cases while it is bad for the families involved is hardly an epidemic.
Inform of it of course but don't blow it out of proportion.

Why would they even sell Factor 50 sunscreen in the UK?

Break dancing into the hearts of millions


#14 duke_Qa

duke_Qa

    I've had this avatar since... 2003?

  • Network Staff
  • 3,837 posts
  • Location:Norway
  • Division:Revora
  • Job:Artist

Posted 28 April 2011 - 01:27 PM

Yeah, it certainly was wise to resurrect a thread about it if you feel that it shouldn't be talked about.

On the topic of saying "stupid lazy British women" is racist: It might be memetist, or culture-elitist, but since there is no "ubermensch" gene that defines a British person, it certainly ain't racist.
Just as people look down upon suicide bombers, I look down upon people who don't use their brains and are too lazy to do their best, though not as intensely.

And this being the internet, you won't catch people's attention without using high-pressure rhetoric :sleep:

"I give you private information on corporations for free and I'm a villain. Mark Zuckerberg gives your private information to corporations for money and he's 'Man of the Year.'" - Assange


#15 Puppeteer

Puppeteer

    title available

  • Global Moderators
  • 2,947 posts
  • Location:United Kingdom
  •  Faute de Mieux
  • Division:Community
  • Job:Magazine Staff/Global Moderator

Posted 28 April 2011 - 04:32 PM

Something odd though is few Australians wear sunscreen


... and it shows

#16 Ash

Ash

    Foxtrot Oscar.

  • Undead
  • 15,526 posts
  • Location:England
  • Projects:Robot Storm
  •  Keep calm and carry on.

Posted 28 April 2011 - 05:56 PM

How is it possible to be racist against a country? That's as absurd as being racist against a religion. Oh, wait...

Seriously, nobody cares. British women, as a rule, are lazy. So are our men. We lead an absurdly sedentary life and everything we eat comes in cardboard boxes or microwaveable bags.

I don't understand anyone who uses sunblock in this country though. That said I rarely use it in 30+C countries. I am going to Cuba at the end of July. Guess what I will not be taking.

Contrary to medical malfeasance exposure to sunlight is healthy. It isn't auto-cancer, the same way as eating lettuce or doing any other act ever isn't auto-cancer.

I do wish we could do something about our morally negligent knee-jerk media.

#17 Vortigern

Vortigern

    Sumquhat quisquis.

  • Division Leaders
  • 4,654 posts
  • Location:Oxfordshire, England.
  • Projects:Workin'...
  •  ...like a workin' man do.
  • Division:Role-Playing Games
  • Job:Division Leader

Posted 28 April 2011 - 10:56 PM

While it may not be a surefire route to chemotherapy, sunburn can be extremely unpleasant, and irritating at the best of times. I would not recommend sitting out under a hot sun for hours at a stretch without any kind of covering, but then maybe I just burn easily. In fact, there's no maybe about it. I burn like an unpaid bill.
I hope I am a good enough writer that some day dwarves kill me and drink my blood for wisdom.

#18 Ash

Ash

    Foxtrot Oscar.

  • Undead
  • 15,526 posts
  • Location:England
  • Projects:Robot Storm
  •  Keep calm and carry on.

Posted 28 April 2011 - 11:17 PM

Mate, I cause snowblind every time I roll my sleeves up. Any sensible person would go inside after a coupla hours anyway so negating the need...come back out again after a couple more hours. XD

#19 Radspakr Wolfbane

Radspakr Wolfbane

    The John Farnham of modding

  • Members
  • 7,722 posts
  • Location:less than 5 meters from my bed
  • Projects:Comeback tour
  •  The Retired Beard

Posted 29 April 2011 - 09:23 AM

Puppet I refute their claims ;)
I have not met a single person ever with skin cancer.
If their figures were accurate I would know at least one person with skin cancer at some point in my life.

It's a simple fact of the media concerns don't sell papers nor do they spread awareness,it has to be an epidemic.

Break dancing into the hearts of millions


#20 Puppeteer

Puppeteer

    title available

  • Global Moderators
  • 2,947 posts
  • Location:United Kingdom
  •  Faute de Mieux
  • Division:Community
  • Job:Magazine Staff/Global Moderator

Posted 29 April 2011 - 10:58 AM

Puppet I refute their claims ;)
I have not met a single person ever with skin cancer.
If their figures were accurate I would know at least one person with skin cancer at some point in my life.

It's a simple fact of the media concerns don't sell papers nor do they spread awareness,it has to be an epidemic.

While that is undoubtedly true, Australia is renowned for having one of the highest rates of skin cancer. I just linked one of the first sites I found... it must be on par with South Africa.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users